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Nationals tender contracts to all 10 arbitration-eligible players

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The Nationals announced this afternoon that they tendered contracts to all ten of their arbitration-eligible players including Ross Detwiler, Jerry Blevins, Stephen Strasburg, Drew Storen, Craig Stammen, Tyler Clippard, Doug Fister, Danny Espinosa, Jose Lobaton and Wilson Ramos.

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The only one anyone was really wondering about was arbitration-eligible left-hander Ross Detwiler, a potential non-tender and trade candidate who struggled working out of the bullpen in 2014 and is projected to make $3.3M next season.

Detwiler, 28, and a 2007 1st Round pick, finished his seventh major league season with Washington with a 4.00 ERA, a 4.16 FIP, 21 walks (3.00 BB/9) and 39 Ks (5.57 K/9) in 47 games and 63 IP out of the bullpen.

In an article by Washington Post writer James Wagner last week, the WaPost reported quoted a "a person familiar with the situation" who said that even if he was tendered a contract, a trade might be best for the lefty.

"Detwiler’s camp has suggested to the Nationals that they pursue that avenue if possible," Wagner wrote.

This afternoon, Detwiler and the other nine arbitration-eligible Nationals were tendered contracts in advance of tonight's 11:59:59 non-tender deadline.

The ten players are Detwiler, fellow left-hander Jerry Blevins, right-handers Stephen Strasburg, Drew Storen, Craig Stammen, Tyler Clippard and Doug Fister, infielder Danny Espinosa and catchers Jose Lobaton and Wilson Ramos.

The ten Nationals combined could earn as much as $48.9M in arbitration based on MLBTraderumors.com's projections.

The Nationals already signed arbitration-eligible bench player Kevin Frandsen to a 1-year/$1M deal for the 2015 campaign.

There could be a hearing coming up which could determine whether or not Nats' slugger Bryce Harper can opt out of the major league deal he signed upon being drafted no.1 overall in 2010 and opt into the arbitration process.

Harper and the Nats could end up in a grievance hearing this month if they can't settle the situation which stretches back to August of his draft year, when the top pick, his agent, Scott Boras, and the Nationals disagreed over the language in his contract and whether or not there was an oral agreement about including the opt-out clause in his deal.