clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Looking back at the career of Washington Nationals legend Aaron Boone

New, 19 comments

Sure, he’s the Yankees’ new manager. But he’s a Nat first.

Washington Nationals Photo Day Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

News broke yesterday that Washington Nationals legend Aaron Boone would be taking over as the new manager of the New York Yankees.

Yes, most may know Boone from his stint with the Yankees in the early 2000s, including a walk-off home run to send the Bronx Bombers to the World Series, but in Washington, D.C., there is no fact more well-known than Boone’s illustrious, long career with the Nats.

In his time in Washington, Boone hit .241 with a jaw-dropping 56 hits over 255 plate appearances in 104 games in 2008, including one whole home run, and also, Tim Dillard’s first strikeout.

Highlights of Boone’s career in Washington included the following:

Headshot number one:

Washington Nationals Photo Day Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

Ah, those were the days. Serious, yet optimistic. Kind, yet concerned.

Headshot number two:

Washington Nationals Photo Day Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

These were darker, more serious times. However, Boone was able to get through it, as demonstrated by....

Headshot number three:

Washington Nationals Photo Day Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

Boone was happy-go-lucky in this time period of his Nationals career.

The sliding-into-double-plays-backslash-steals phase

Washington Nationals v New York Mets Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Washington Nationals v New York Mets Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images

These were troubling times for Boone as his 2008 legend waned. However, he would always be remembered in Nationals lore for this high five with Ryan Zimmerman, soon to be enshrined in a statue at Nationals Park*.

Washington Nationals v New York Mets Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images

Boone will forever be exclusively a Nationals legend, who spent a few months with the Yankees. With that said, Nats fans will most likely be willing to give him up, if only because they care so deeply about him and want to see him succeed after such a long tenure with Washington.

[ed. note - “ * = Details on the statue have not been confirmed, do not re-produce this, this is not happening, this is sarcasm, don’t, stop, we see you, stop!!!!”]