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Washington Nationals’ Prospects: FBB’s Top 40 Prospects List 2019 - 40-31...

Over the next few days, we’re counting down the Top 40 prospects in the Washington Nationals’ system, starting with Nos. 40-31...

Jake Irvin pic screencap’d via @MLB.com

Over the next few days, we’ll be counting down FBB’s first (in a while) list of the Washington Nationals’ Top 40 prospects for 2019, starting with Nos. 40-31. A new list will follow for each of the next few days as we break down the top players in the organization and look at some names you’ll be hearing a lot more about in the upcoming weeks, months, and years...

All video and scouting content is provided by 2080 Baseball.

(#40) Jacob Condra-Bogan, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’3’’ / 220 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 24y, 7m

Video | Spotlight

The Nationals received Condra-Bogan in exchange for Brian Goodwin last year in a one-for-one deal. His fastball touches 98 mph at best but works with a wide velocity range, dropping to the low-90s when he’s tired. A mid-80s slider flashes average but also is inconsistent. Condra-Bogan has intriguing tools but is more of a lottery ticket than other ETA 2020 prospects on this list.

(#39) Chandler Day, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2021 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’5’’ / 175 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: SS-A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 21y, 10m

Video | Spotlight

Day paired up with Reid Schaller (on the horizon) in Vanderbilt’s bullpen, and was drafted four rounds later than his now-teammate in last year’s draft. He’s an extra-thin relief arm that relies on a split-like change to speed up a 88-to-92 mph fastball. He’s a relief arm that’s more pitchability than stuff, keeping hitters off-balance by sequencing three pitches for strikes. Day’s ceiling is a middle reliever, but he’ll have to prove his lack of velocity won’t hold him back against higher-level hitters.

(#38) Jackson Tetreault, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2021 Role Description: Long Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’5’’ / 170 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 22y, 9m

Video

Tetreault was seen as a development project after being selected in the seventh round in 2017. True to that form, he’s raw for a 22-year-old and likely will pitch all of next season in A-Ball. An extra-lean 6-foot-5 and 170 pounds, Tetreault’s fastball works between 88-to-94 mph, sitting in the low-90s. His velocity has a wide range as his fastball loses ticks throughout an outing, and despite a frame that looks projectable, Tetreault might just lack strength. He doesn’t rely heavily on either off-speed pitch, though a low-80s changeup and high-70s curve both flash as playable offerings.

(#37) Frankie Bartow, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2021 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’3’’ / 180 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 22y, 1m

Video | Spotlight

Bartow was the Nationals’ 11th round pick in last year’s draft from the University of Miami. His fastball works in the low-90s with armside run, backed up by a sharp slider and splitter that both project as big league pitches. The ceiling is a three-pitch middle reliever with the arsenal to handle both lefties and righties.

(#36) Tomas Alastre, RHP

Ceiling: 45 Risk: Extreme ETA: 2022 Role Description: Swingman

Ht/Wt: 6’4’’ / 170 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 20y, 9m

Video | Report

Alastre got hit hard at times as one of the youngest regular starting pitchers in the South Atlantic League, showing growth as last season went on. The 20-year-old is all projection but has a physical 6-foot-4 frame and throws strikes with three pitches. His fastball works in the low-90s and could finish a tick firmer than that as he fills out. Both a curveball and changeup grade as playable-to-average offerings, giving the ceiling of a swingman or low-end No. 5 starter. Alastre is more of a lottery ticket than a safe-bet big league prospect at this point.

(#35) Kyle Johnston, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2021 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’0’’ / 190 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 22y, 8m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Video #3 | Report

Johnston was a college teammate of Tres Barrera (on the horizon) at the University of Texas, drafted by the Nationals one year after Barrera in 2017. Johnston pitched at two A-Ball levels last season, seeing time as both a starter and reliever. He projects in the ‘pen long-term, where fringy stuff in a rotation role plays up in shorter stints. His fastball peaks in the mid-90s and could sit there more regularly in relief, backed up by a solid cutter and adequate secondary stuff.

(#34) Sterling Sharp, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Long Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’4’’ / 170 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 23y, 10m

Video | Spotlight

Sharp won’t blow anyone away, but the finesse righty relies on deception and movement to induce lots of weak contact. He was an All-Star in the Carolina League last season and reached Double-A by the end of the year. Sharp’s fastball dips into the mid-80s later in starts and rarely cracks 90 mph, but extra-long levers and a deceptive motion help play up the lack of velocity. His best pitch is a changeup with above-average separation and movement, something that baffled A-Ball hitters but might not be as effective up the ladder. Sharp is the type of prospect that needs to prove it at every level, potentially fitting as a long man or funky situational reliever if his unorthodox approach works at the big league level.

(#33) Jordan Mills, LHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Situational Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’5’’ / 215 lbs. B/T: L/L Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 26y, 10m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Video #3 | Spotlight

Mills is older than most prospects and is soon to turn 27. He relies on deception, slinging the ball from a sidearm slot and extra-deceptive closed delivery. Mills’ fastball tops out at 91-92 mph and dips into the high-80s, but all the moving parts disrupt timing and play it up. His best pitch is a changeup, a pitch that allowed him to post reverse splits last season and actually fare better against right-handed bats despite a motion that looks geared towards hiding the ball from same-side hitters.

(#32) Jake Irvin, RHP

Ceiling: 45 Risk: Extreme ETA: 2022 Role Description: Role Player

Ht/Wt: 6’6’’ / 225 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: SS-A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 22y, 1m

Irvin was the Nats’ fourth-rounder last year from the University of Oklahoma. He’s a durable 6-foot-6 workhorse with average-ish stuff across the board. Irvin’s fastball sits in the low-90s, backed up by a decent 80-to-82 mph slider and fringy changeup he’ll need to develop in order to remain in the rotation. Washington worked him carefully during his pro debut last summer, never allowing Irvin to work more than two innings at a time. We see the ceiling as a swingman or lesser back end starter.

(#31) Andry Arias, OF

Ceiling: 45 Risk: Extreme ETA: 2023 Role Description: Role Player

Ht/Wt: 6’3’’ / 180 lbs. B/T: L/L Highest Level: R Age (as of April 1, 2019): 18y, 9m

Video | Spotlight

Arias won’t turn 19 until the middle of next season and he’s yet to make his stateside debut. A projectable 6-foot-3 and 180 pounds, he slashed .270/.360/.412 in the DSL last summer with enthusing peripherals for his age. Arias shows a smooth left-handed stroke that could grow into both average and power. He’s listed as a 1B but is mobile enough to line up in either corner outfield spot. Washington likely will hold him back in Extended Spring Training to start next year, making Arias an interesting follow once short-season ball gets going.

Coming Soon: Nos. 30-21 will be published tomorrow morning...

• A native of Washington, D.C., Adam will be periodically contributing scouting pieces on Nationals prospects for Federal Baseball. Currently, he’s the Assistant Director of Professional Evaluation at 2080 Baseball. Previously, Adam worked in the Baseball Operations departments of the Baltimore Orioles and Texas Rangers after serving as a Senior Prospect Writer for Baseball Prospectus. You can follow him on Twitter: @2080adam. Adam can be reached at amcinturff@2080baseball.com for all podcast and media requests.