clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Washington Nationals’ Prospects: FBB’s Top 40 Prospects List 2019 - Nos. 30-21...

New, comments

Counting down the Top 40 prospects in the Washington Nationals’ system, with Nos. 30-21 today...

Minor League Baseball: Arizona Fall League-Glendale Desert Dogs at Scottsdale Scorpions Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Over the next few days, we’ll be counting down FBB’s first (in a while) list of the Washington Nationals’ Top 40 prospects for 2019, with Nos. 30-21 today. A new list will follow for each of the next couple days as we break down the top players in the organization and look at some names you’ll be hearing a lot more about in the upcoming weeks, months, and years...

All video and scouting content is provided by 2080 Baseball.

(#30) Jose Sanchez, SS

Ceiling: 45 Risk: Extreme ETA: 2023 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 5’11’’ / 155 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: SS-A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 18y, 8m

Video

Sanchez joined (#3) Luis Garcia and (#6) Yasel Antuna atop the Nats’ J2 class in 2016, signing for a $950K bonus out of Venezuela. While Garcia and Antuna reached the full-season level in 2018, Sanchez started in Extended Spring Training before moving to short-season ball. Sanchez is a glove-first infielder with the defensive tools to stick at shortstop long-term. He’s a good athlete with projectable looseness and balance in the swing, but has struggled mightily at the plate in two seasons as a pro. Still just 18, there’s plenty of time for Sanchez to grow into more offense as he gets stronger. He projects as a utility infielder until he shows more with the bat.

(#29) Taylor Gushue, C

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 6’1’’ / 233 lbs. B/T: S/R Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 25y, 3m

Gushue lacks any one carry tool to project as a regular, though his switch-hitting pop at a valuable position could get him to the big leagues off the bench. He’s a solid defensive catcher who can turn on his pitch with power, though limited hitting ability plays down his in-game home run outputs. Defensively, he’s an above-average receiver with an understanding of how to frame and present strikes. Gushue scuffled in his first extended taste of Double-A last year and will need to show more with the bat to reach his ceiling.

(#28) Ben Braymer, LHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Long Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’2’’ / 215 lbs. B/T: L/L Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 24y, 11m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Video #3 | Spotlight

Braymer had a big 2018 season and was named the organization’s Co-Pitcher of the Year in 2018. His fastball sits in the high-80s as a starter but works 91-to-93 mph in relief. Braymer’s 78-to-81 mph curveball is his bread-and-butter pitch, a shapely downer with sharp bite. He struggles with a changeup and doesn’t have the stuff to profile as a starter in the big leagues, fitting as a long man or middle reliever that faces mostly lefties.

(#27) Taylor Guilbeau, LHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’4’’ / 180 lbs. B/T: L/L Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 25y, 10m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Spotlight | Report

Guilbeau upped his prospect stock significantly after being sent to Arizona Fall League, showing a fastball up a few ticks and improved secondary pitches. The extra-lanky lefty creates a tough angle on same-side hitters, slinging a mid-90s fastball from a low slot that shows the ball late. His mid-80s slider could be an average pitch, and a changeup showed improvements this fall as well. Guilbeau pitched well enough to go from NP to potential 40-Man addition by November, but the Nationals ultimately opted to leave him unprotected from the Rule 5 Draft. Guilbeau went unselected, so he’s likely to head to Double-A in 2019.

(#26) Jake Noll, INF

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 6’2’’ / 195 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 25y, 0m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Video #3 | Spotlight

Noll is a hit-first prospect who doesn’t quite have the power to fit a corner profile and lacks a defensive position. The Nationals have tried him extensively at both 2B and 3B, but he’s below-average at both spots and could wind up a 1B/LF type. He isn’t great with the glove anywhere, but Noll’s makeup and aptitude allow him the chance to suit up at a variety of positions. Paired with his solid feel for the barrel, the ceiling is a bench player with some defensive versatility.

(#25) Jhon Romero, RHP

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Middle Relief

Ht/Wt: 5’10’’ / 195 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 24y, 2m

Report

Romero was the prospect returned from the Cubs for Brandon Kintzler at the 2018 trade deadline. He reached Double-A in Washington’s system by season’s end, and while he’ll likely return there to start next season, Romero is the type of relief prospect that could move quickly. His heavy fastball sits at 94 mph and touches 95-to-96 mph when he needs something extra, backed up by a slider and changeup that both grade as average pitches. The ceiling is a middle reliever with the pitch mix to face both lefties and righties.

(#24) Telmito Agustin, OF

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2021 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 5’10’’ / 160 lbs. B/T: L/L Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 22y, 5m

Video

Agustin got off to a fast start to his pro career but has struggled to get over the hump in Advanced A. He repeated the Carolina League in 2018 and fared much better, slashing .302/.368/.454 as a 21-year-old. Agustin has bulked up the last few years and now profiles in LF only, lacking the wheels for CF and the arm for RF. His feel to hit from the left side gives the upside of a bench player.

(#23) Tres Barrera, C

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 6’0’’ / 215 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: A+ Age (as of April 1, 2019): 24y, 6m

Video #1 | Video #2 | Spotlight

Barrera is a glove-first catcher with plus intangibles and game-calling ability. He has moved one level at a time since being selected in 2016’s sixth-round, playing all of last season in the Carolina League. A sound catch/throw guy with occasional pull power, all the tools are here to profile as a viable backup catcher granted Barrera can hit enough at the big league level. There isn’t much upside here, but this type of catching prospect generally hangs around a long time.

(#22) Joan Adon, RHP

Ceiling: 45 Risk: Extreme ETA: 2022 Role Description: Setup Relief

Ht/Wt: 6’2’’ / 185 lbs. B/T: R/R Highest Level: SS-A Age (as of April 1, 2019): 20y, 7m

Video | Spotlight

Adon is a promising arm who has yet to reach full-season ball in Washington’s system. He pitched most of last year in the GCL, moving to the New York-Penn League late in 2018. Adon’s wiry frame and quick arm generate mid-90s fastball velocity with lively run, backed up by a 84-to-86 mph slider that projects as a big league pitch. His changeup and overall feel are crude, as Adon is still more a thrower than pitcher. We see him as an interesting lotto ticket type of prospect that could make some noise with a strong full-season debut in 2019.

(#21) Drew Ward, 1B

Ceiling: 40 Risk: High ETA: 2020 Role Description: Bench Player

Ht/Wt: 6’3’’ / 215 lbs. B/T: L/R Highest Level: AA Age (as of April 1, 2019): 24y, 4m

Video | Report

Ward was once one of the more prominent prospects in this system but has stalled in recent years. He’s now a 1B-only, which adds loads more pressure to his need to produce at the plate in order to carve out a Major League role. Upper-level lefties have baffled him, and Ward now looks more like a platoon-heavy bench bat.

FBB’S TOP 40 NATS’ PROSPECTS FOR 2019: CHECK OUT NOS. 40-31 HERE.

A native of Washington, D.C., Adam will be periodically contributing scouting pieces on Nationals prospects for Federal Baseball. Currently, he’s the Assistant Director of Professional Evaluation at 2080 Baseball. Previously, Adam worked in the Baseball Operations departments of the Baltimore Orioles and Texas Rangers after serving as a Senior Prospect Writer for Baseball Prospectus. You can follow him on Twitter: @2080adam. Adam can be reached at amcinturff@2080baseball.com for all podcast and media requests.